What martial arts storytelling owes to The Water Margin, wuxia novel from 14th century adapted for Japanese TV and by Chang Cheh for cinema, and how its themes and style still resonate

//What martial arts storytelling owes to The Water Margin, wuxia novel from 14th century adapted for Japanese TV and by Chang Cheh for cinema, and how its themes and style still resonate

What martial arts storytelling owes to The Water Margin, wuxia novel from 14th century adapted for Japanese TV and by Chang Cheh for cinema, and how its themes and style still resonate

The classic 14th-century novel The Water Margin, attributed to Shi Nai’an and Luo Guanzhong, wasn’t the first book to talk about heroic martial artists, but it has proved the most influential.Its 120 chapters tell of 108 outlaws who inhabit the marshes of Mount Liang in Shandong province, eastern China, where they fight for justice against the corrupt officials of the waning Song dynasty.The story has had numerous cinematic and television adaptations, notably a mid-1970s Japanese television…

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By | 2021-09-18T21:15:21+00:00 September 18th, 2021|Entertainment|Comments Off on What martial arts storytelling owes to The Water Margin, wuxia novel from 14th century adapted for Japanese TV and by Chang Cheh for cinema, and how its themes and style still resonate