The Nile: A New History of the World’s Greatest River by Terje Tvedt, reviewed

//The Nile: A New History of the World’s Greatest River by Terje Tvedt, reviewed

The Nile: A New History of the World’s Greatest River by Terje Tvedt, reviewed

The Nile

We look at this epic work which covers all of the countries which the Nile river passes through. Written by Norwegian expert on the Nile, Terje Tvedt you can learn more about the book here.

The Nile: A New History of the World’s Greatest River by Terje Tvedt, reviewed

Coming in at 350 pages, and in a smaller than average font there is a lot in this book, and it took us a while to read it (yes perhaps we need reading glasses now). This is not to say that it isn’t a fascinating and interesting read. Tvedt has truly travelled the Nile, in all of it’s unexpected locations and source rivers. Of course the Nile’s story begins with Egypt, at least in the sequence of chapters in this book. However it also includes Uganda, Burundi, Congo and Eritrea among other countries bounded by their association with the Nile.

Tvedt brings interesting insights and links these countries in ways that you might not immediately have imagined. Hemingway, Hotel Rwanda, Bob Geldof and Heart of Darkness all make an appearance in this book, and it is the better for it. In mentioning Joseph Conrad’s finest work Tvedt is also conscious of trying to avoid what would be considered to be the classic cliches about Africa from a Western perspective. He is certainly cognisant of the important of not romanticising Africa and its rich history and deep cultural complexity.

This book may be slightly hard to categorise, part history, part water management case study, but also definitely infused with personal insights, and some impressive descriptions of interesting and unique places including the islands within the Eritrean lake where Jesus and his parents were said to have sheltered. This is an interesting and thought provoking book, definitely one worth checking out.

More about the book here ->

The greatest river in the world has a long and fascinating history. Professor Terje Tvedt, one of the world’s leading experts on the history of waterways, travels upstream along the river’s mouth to its sources. The result is a travelogue through 5000 years and 11 countries, from the Mediterranean to Central Africa. This is the fascinating story of the immense economic, political and mythical significance of the river. Brimming with accounts of central characters in the struggle for the Nile – from Caesar and Cleopatra, to Churchill and Mussolini, and on to the political leaders of today, The Nile is also the story of water as it nourished a civilization.

The greatest river in the world has a long and fascinating history and, through his latest book, Professor Terje Tvedt, one of the world’s leading experts on the history of waterways, travels upstream along the river’s mouth to its sources. The result is a travelogue through 5000 years and 11 countries, from the Mediterranean to Central Africa that dredges the fascinating story ofthe immense economic, political and mythical significance of the river.

Brimming with accounts of central characters in the struggle for the Nile – from Caesar and Cleopatra, to Churchill and Mussolini, and on to the political leaders of today, The Nile is also the story of water as it nourished a civilization.

The book was originally published in Norway in 2012 and has since been translated into Egyptian, Italian, Dutch, German and Serbian. This will be the first time the book will be available in English.

Terje Tvedt is professor of geography at the University of Bergen and professor of political science and of global history at the University of Oslo. He has presented three successful television documentaries on water, shown in 150 countries worldwide, so is a great speaker! He is the series editor of the pioneering History of Water series, published by I.B. Tauris.

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By | 2021-08-25T17:22:42+00:00 August 25th, 2021|Technology|Comments Off on The Nile: A New History of the World’s Greatest River by Terje Tvedt, reviewed