Rohingya culture reviving in refugee camps, but songs and music carry a bittersweet touch

//Rohingya culture reviving in refugee camps, but songs and music carry a bittersweet touch

Rohingya culture reviving in refugee camps, but songs and music carry a bittersweet touch

Chain-smoking singer Gudar Mia, who recently turned 80 in a refugee camp in Bangladesh, lights another cigarette, closes his eyes and croons the opening words of a Rohingya folk song.“Sorry, my throat is not good,” he says, taking a puff as he sits cross-legged in the home of his lifelong friend, Amir Ali, a 75-year-old violinist.As young men back in Myanmar they had played together in a wedding band, touring their native Rakhine State on the western border and performing on moonlit nights…

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By | 2019-05-10T00:00:11+00:00 May 10th, 2019|Entertainment|Comments Off on Rohingya culture reviving in refugee camps, but songs and music carry a bittersweet touch